The theology of climate change

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Man-induced global warming, leading to climate change, is considered to be the most significant threat to the future of life on our planet. The cause of global warming lies in modern industrial growth based on fossil fuels, releasing significant quantities of "greenhouse" gases into the atmosphere. In general, it is the lifestyles to which we all aspire that is causing the difficulty. However, the impacts of climate change are felt most acutely by the poorest in society. It is, therefore, a politically sensitive topic that splits nations and communities.

Both the science and politics of climate change have also challenged our theology, causing us to look again at our understanding of God and our place in the world. Some commentators blame the problem on the way in which Christianity has emphasised humanity to the exclusion of all other creatures; others see this is an opportunity to re-align faith and science.

In a series of talks, Nick Read asks: How might a Christian understanding of God and man help, or hinder, as we try and rise to the challenge of climate change?

There will be five sessions, each taking place in the Rectory at Kingsland on Wednesdays during Lent from 7.30 to 9.00 pm starting on 8th March and ending on 5th April. If you can't make all five, don't worry, there will be notes produced for each session — come to as many as you can. Coffee and tea will be provided.

There is no charge, the meetings are always informal, friendly and the pace of each session will be gentle enough to carry everyone along. You are welcome simply to come and listen, there is no requirement "to have to join in" beyond turning up!

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